New Info




Memes

Author Topic: Coaching: When Is It Considered Crossing The Line?  (Read 3931 times)

Description:
Coaching: When Is It Considered Crossing The Line?
« on: August 31, 2018, 10:38:19 AM »
I'm writing this article due in part to a couple of incidents which took place this past summer involving High School hockey head coaches on the east coast.



All of which were based on parents rush to judgement and their demands to unseat the teams head coach because they were upset about their kids playing time or assumed treatment on the ice. In an effort to appease the rush to judgement and not offend anybody, the coaches jobs were terminated immediately without due process.

The first story: This coach was fired because a parent complained he was too hard on his kid with abusive behavior and degrading him verbally, the coach was exonerated several months later after an investigation proved the complaints were unfounded Milford CT: 24yr Coach Fired, Then Re-Hired

The second story, (most recent): This coach was fired because a parent or parents accused him of recruiting and ignoring players within the school system who already played for the hockey club but were refused selection to the varsity squad. It only took 24hrs for him to be exonerated and allowed to return to his position Downingtown East HS protest

Have things changed so dramatically over the past 30 years since my youth that it's at a a point where coaches cannot coach anymore? Some view their kids teams coaching philosophy or approach to instruction as too demanding, demeaning and abusive. While others see favoritism, unfair treatment and bullying, but is it? Is accountability, responsibility and constructive criticism now considered offensive and degrading treatment of players in youth sports?

Preface: I'll start by recalling a few memories from my youth hockey experience as a member of the Council Rock Indians Varsity hockey program in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The time was 1987 to 1992. I started playing JV in 7th grade and quickly moved up to swing in 8th, by 9th grade I was playing varsity exclusively. My coach was what could be termed as "tough". Most of the players didn't like him, similarly many parents couldn't stand him. Why you ask? Because he had expectations, and it was assumed that if you made his hockey team, you had a responsibility to work hard in order to maintain your job. Our teams during this run won 3 Flyers cup championships, (the highest honor for high school hockey in South Eastern PA.) and 2 state championships while almost always clinching 1st place in the SHSHL, (Suburban High School Hockey League). Our coach used profanity, in fact we often thought that was the only vocabulary he knew. He threatened players with cutting ice time and even cutting them from the team if they didn't perform the way he expected them to. He threw water bottles, sticks and screamed like you wouldn't believe. He'd bang his head against the glass if we did drills wrong, he'd whack you in the skates and even push you around to prove a point about execution of plays. Did we hate it? Damn right we did but to this day as I look back I see his approach as one of discipline. He expected his players to be level headed and determined with only one goal and that was to win. I laugh about it today but looking back I see he taught us how to respect each other not only on the ice but off of it as well. He taught all of us to be accountable for our actions when we performed, if we made  mistakes he corrected them independently with the player and as a team together. If we lost games and one person was responsible for losing because of a bad play, we did wind sprints together before we'd practice until every player understood what his responsibility was to fix what didn't work. If somebody was goofing off during practice, the entire team was punished with wind sprints and boards. In the end our teams over those years and beyond produced a number of successful collegiate hockey players. For us, (the wife and I) we expect that same type of coaching instruction with our kids. We tell the coaches not to sugar coat anything with our boys and our boys we believe have become better players and better people because of it. They have no problem with being accountable as responsible teenagers.

Can coaches no longer be coaches, but instead have to be their players best friend and biggest fan? Is expecting accountability and responsibility now considered crossing the line, or has it been and I just haven't noticed?

Guest

Re: Coaching: When Is It Considered Crossing The Line?
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2018, 10:49:03 AM »
GREAT READ AND TOTALLY AGREE TIMES HAVE CHANGED AND ITS SO SAD 😞

Guest

Re: Coaching: When Is It Considered Crossing The Line?
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2018, 11:10:39 AM »
The first story sounds like a kid/parents (because anymore when you coach the kid, you coach the parents) were upset with the child’s lack of success and decided to make waves. On the coaches side there. In the second story that coach was skirting the system and bringing in non-district players therefore reducing an in-district players chance of making varsity. That’s wrong on the coaches side. Those parents were right in that situation.

Guest

Re: Coaching: When Is It Considered Crossing The Line?
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2018, 11:16:53 AM »
The coach in the Downingtown incident was fired for recruiting. That is absolutely true but instead they chose to reinstate his job and the board for the club took the fall instead. The entire board was disbanded after he got his job back yesterday but they should all pay, he knew full well several players were not permitted to play for that team due to school boundary restrictions. Historically that is referenced as cheating.

Guest

Re: Coaching: When Is It Considered Crossing The Line?
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2019, 06:51:30 PM »
There is being a tough coach but it is another thing if the coach hit your child in the mouth with a hockey stick   

Guest

Re: Coaching: When Is It Considered Crossing The Line?
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2019, 08:44:46 AM »
Buddy, if a coach strikes a player the cops should be called and USA hockey should expel the coach. That's not being tough that's assault

 

With Quick-Reply you can write a post when viewing a topic without loading a new page. You can still use bulletin board code and smileys as you would in a normal post.

Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
Unless you're sure you want to reply, please consider starting a new topic.

Verification:
Type the letters shown in the picture
Listen to the letters / Request another image
Type the letters shown in the picture:
type #$hockey!@ - all lowercase:

Ken Doak coaching?

Started by GuestBoard General Youth Hockey Info

Replies: 3
Views: 1600
Last post March 22, 2019, 10:27:43 PM
by Guest
COACHING IN MONMOUTH AREA

Started by GuestBoard General Youth Hockey Info

Replies: 3
Views: 485
Last post March 31, 2019, 01:50:12 PM
by Guest
Coaching: Reverse Psychology

Started by Youth Hockey InfoBoard General Youth Hockey Info

Replies: 2
Views: 1044
Last post May 03, 2019, 12:29:58 PM
by Guest
Coaching: Nick Saban Says Let The Players Play

Started by Youth Hockey InfoBoard General Youth Hockey Info

Replies: 2
Views: 574
Last post April 06, 2019, 09:29:48 AM
by Guest
PAID coaching opportunity DE Blue Hens

Started by Youth Hockey InfoBoard General Youth Hockey Info

Replies: 0
Views: 622
Last post April 22, 2019, 12:17:37 PM
by Youth Hockey Info